Simple tips on how to keep kids eyes healthy

Ensuring our children’s eyes stay healthy requires a proactive approach

Having a clear vision is an important part of your child’s learning and development experience.  Undetected vision problems could take effect on children’s focus and interest in activities at school, simply because they are unable to have optimal vision.

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Routine eye assessments

Just as your child is about to go back to school is a great time to start booking them in for an eye exam.  As a child’s vision develops so rapidly, routine comprehensive eye exams can support early detection and intervention of complications.  Having a clear vision is an important part of your child’s learning and development experience.  Undetected vision problems could take effect on children’s focus and interest in activities at school, simply because they are unable to have optimal vision. [1]

 

Protecting children’s eyes in the sun [3]

Spending a day out in the sun whether by the beach or in the park without suitable eye protection can lead to a short term  yet very painful burn on the eyes surface, which is very much like sunburn. This can occur not only in hot weather but also in cold weather such as in the reflected sunlight from snow.   Try to encourage your child to avoid looking directly at the sun as this can lead to permanent eye damage.

Where possible try to encourage children to wear protective clothing:

  • A wide brimmed hat to shade the face, neck and ears
  • Sunglasses made to the European standard, with a wide frame to block as much of the sunlight from the eyes as possible

 

Supporting a child with an eye injury:

  • Try not to touch, rub or place pressure on the eye
  • If something is stuck in the eye do not remove it, unless it is very small and the child is able to blink quickly and clear the object away from the eye
  • Try to avoid using medication or ointment on the eye
  • When eyes have been exposed to chemicals, try to use water to bathe the eye
  • Where the eye is cut or punctured, cover it with a suitable eye patch.

 

Common Eye injuries [2]:

  • Burns from chemicals: Exposure to household cleaning products
  • Cuts and punctures: Cuts from glass or tools
  • Foreign bodies: Grit, wood, or metal lodged in the eye
  • Scratches: from finger nails or tree branches
  • Blows to the eye: Being hit by a fist, elbow or ball

 

 

References

  1. http://yoursightmatters.com/keeping-your-childrens-eyes-healthy-and-safe/
  2. http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Eye-injuries/Pages/Introduction.aspx
  3. http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/skin/Pages/Sunsafe.aspx#eyes

 

 

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